Monday, 26 September 2011

Book of the Week: Growing Up Amish

Growing Up Amish

One fateful starless night, 17-year-old Ira Wagler got up at 2 AM, left a scribbled note under his pillow, packed all of his earthly belongings into in a little black duffel bag, and walked away from his home in the Amish settlement of Bloomfield, Iowa. Now, in this heartwarming memoir, Ira paints a vivid portrait of Amish life—from his childhood days on the family farm, his Rumspringa rite of passage at age 16, to his ultimate decision to leave the Amish Church for good at age 26. Growing Up Amish is the true story of one man’s quest to discover who he is and where he belongs. Readers will laugh, cry, and be inspired by this charming yet poignant coming of age story set amidst the backdrop of one of the most enigmatic cultures in America today—the Old Order Amish.

Monday, 19 September 2011

Book of the Week: Gunning For God

by John Lennox.

Since the twin towers crashed to the ground on 9/11 there has been no end to claims that religion 'is dangerous', 'kills' , or 'poisons everything'. And if religion is the problem with the world, say the New Atheists, the answer is simple: get rid of it. But are things really so straightforward? Tackling Hawking, Dawkins, Dennett, Hitchens, and a newcomer in the field - the French philosopher Michel Onfray - John Lennox points out some of the fallacies in the New Atheist approach, arguing that their irrational and unscientific methodology leaves them guilty of the very obstinate foolishness they criticise in dogmatic religious folks. Erudite and wide-ranging, Gunning for God packs some debilitating punches. However, it also puts forward new ideas about the nature of God and Christianity that will give Dawkins' best friends and worst enemies alike some stimulating food for thought.

Monday, 12 September 2011

Book of the Week: Bible - The Story of the King James Version

* Marking the 400th anniversary of the King James Version, this accessible yet authoritative history, explains why and how the Authorised Version came into being
* Brings to life the controversies surrounding later revisions, helping the reader to understand why and when new editions were issued
* Investigates the varied reception of the King James Version across the world, particularly looking at its enduring popularity in America
* Lavishly illustrated with reproductions from early editions of the King James Bible and portraits of key players in its history
* Appendices contain short biographies of the translators and a guide to the 74 page preliminaries of the 1611 edition

This is a history of the King James Version of the Bible (known in Britain as the Authorised Version) over the four hundred years from its remote beginnings to the present day. Gordon Campbell, expert in Renaissance literatures, tells the fascinating and complex story of how this translation came to be commissioned, of who the translators were, and of how the translation was accomplished. The story does not end with the printing of that first edition, but introduces the subsequent generations who edited and interacted with the text. The present text of the King James Version differs in thousands of small details from the original edition. Campbell traces the textual history from 1611 to the establishment of the modern text by Oxford University Press in 1769.
Attitudes to the King James Version have shifted through time and territory, ranging from adulation to deprecation and attracting the attention of a wide variety of adherents. It is more widely read in America today than in any other country, and its particular history in there is given due attention. Generously illustrated with reproductions taken from early editions, this volume helps to explain the enduring popularity of the King James Version throughout the world today.